After the Thanksgiving holiday layoff, I got paid again and resumed work. This kind of hurt, because the funds I had designated for it went partially to the rental of the sander that didn’t work, and then I spent money for gas to get home on.

So, I had to rent a second sander and purchase paper.

Anyway, I didn’t get it picked up until 5:00 pm on Monday, and spent all evening and all night sanding the floors. Let’s take a look.

As you can see, this sander, using a 20-grit paper, cut quickly through the old finish and got right to the wood. It is a lot more labor intensive. With an orbital sander, the unit can stay in one place without too much danger of gouging the wood. Not so one of these. You absolutely must keep it moving at all times, as the drum will quickly gouge out a trough in the wood.

A few problems ensued, natually!

For some odd reason three of the sheets of paper just shredded. I know I got all the nails and things off the floor, so this had me puzzled. After those three sheets, I had no further problems.

Except for the dust collector. I noticed the bag wasn’t filling with sawdust, so I had take apart the unit to get to the clog.

This happened using the 20-grit paper; it really rips up a lot of floor in a short time, so the sawdust is heavy and sticky with old varnish. (Safety note: NEVER leave piles of sawdust in a closed bag, they have a tendency to go up in spontaneous combustion!) I just shook the sawdust out in the yard.

Finally, I got all the floors sanded. Here’s what it looked like then.

I am not sure why there is a darker area from the wall to about 3 feet out. This machine operates by turning it on and walking backward as you sand, so you have about 3 feet you don’t get on the first pass, and then you have to turn around and go the opposite way. Perhaps it has something to do with the direction of the grain; trees grow upward, so perhaps going in the opposite direction creates a different “cut.” No other way to do it, though.

Obviously noticeable is a larger gap where the sander couldn’t reach, about 4 inches wide.

To get to that I used my trusty belt sander, with a 50-grit coarse paper.

I could have rented an edger, but as seen here, this does a great job. I went out to Wal-Mart last night to round up all the 50-grit paper they had in stock.

And here’s the wall after sanding the edges.

The quarter-round molding will cover up the remaining lines, for the most part. And the stain I plan to use will hide the leftover, visible areas if all goes according to plan.

Old total: $284.83

New total $369.96 (cost of renting sander plus paper)

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